Madison County, New York

Industrial Development Agency

Board Meeting Notice

July meeting POSTPONED UNTIL AUGUST 17, 2017- Richard Bargabos, Chairman, has called a meeting of the Madison County IDA for August 17, 2017. The Meeting will begin at 3pm and will take place at Madison County Center for Economic Development in Canastota.

News:
Cazenovia College ranks among best in the nation

Oneida Daily Dispatch 10.8.16

CAZENOVIA >> For the 13th consecutive year, Cazenovia College has been ranked among the top undergraduate colleges in U.S. News & World Report’s Best Colleges publication.

“Being recognized as one of America’s best colleges for 13 years running—and now a “Best Value” school as well—is a reflection of our commitment to student success and a testimony to the dedicated faculty and staff here at Cazenovia,” says Ron Chesbrough, president of Cazenovia College. “We’re focused on providing students with real-life experiences that lead to real-life successes.”

According to the 2017 edition of Best Colleges, released Sept. 13, Cazenovia is eighth among the top tier regional colleges in the North, an area consisting of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and New England.

In addition, Cazenovia College is ranked seventh among top tier regional colleges in the North as a “Best Value” school. According to U.S. News and World Report, this determination takes into account a school’s academic quality, based on its Best Colleges ranking, and the 2016-17 net cost of attendance for a student who received the average level of need-based financial aid.

U.S. News & World Report’s annual survey of colleges and universities in the United States is based on a number of factors, including average graduation and freshman retention rates, class sizes, student/faculty ratio, alumni giving, and peer institution assessment. According to the regional college rankings, the schools that are recognized “focus almost entirely on the undergraduate experience and offer a broad range of programs.” The Best Colleges 2017 guidebook will be available in early October.

Cazenovia College is an independent, co-educational college offering bachelor degree programs in the liberal arts and professional studies. Cazenovia, in addition to being named one of “America’s Best Colleges,” is also a national College of Distinction. For more information, visit www.cazenovia.edu.

Public Hearing Notices:

Carriagehouse Apartments

Notice is hereby given that a public hearing pursuant to Section 859-a(2) of the General Municipal Law of the State of New York (the “Act”) and Section 147(f) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”) will be held by Madison County Industrial Development Agency (the “Issuer”) on the 12th day of September, 2016 at 11: 00 a.m., local time, in the Village Offices, 90 Albany Street, Cazenovia, Madison County, New York, in connection with the following matters:

Carriage House Village Apartments and also known as Carriagehouse Village Apts., L.P., a New York Limited Partnership (the “Company”), has presented an application (the “Application”) to the Issuer, a copy of which Application is on file at the office of the Issuer, requesting that the Issuer consider undertaking a project (the “Project”) for the benefit of the Company, said Project consisting of the following: (A) (1) the acquisition of an interest in an approximately 2.74 acre parcel of land located on Carriagehouse Lane currently known as 5 Carriagehouse Circle in the Town and Village of Cazenovia, Madison County, New York (tax map no. 95.54-1-2.1) (the “Land”), together with seven (7) buildings containing in the aggregate approximately 38,000 square feet of space located thereon (collectively, the “Facility”) (2) the renovation of the Facility and (3) the acquisition and installation therein and thereon of certain machinery and equipment (the “Equipment”) (the Land, the Facility and the Equipment being collectively referred to as the “Project Facility”), all of the foregoing to constitute a 42-unit senior living apartment complex and other directly or indirectly related activities; (B) the financing of all or a portion of the costs of the foregoing by the issuance of revenue bonds of the Issuer in one or more issues or series in an aggregate principal amount sufficient to pay all or a portion of the cost of undertaking the Project, together with necessary incidental costs in connection therewith, said aggregate principal amount presently estimated to be approximately $2,000,000 and in any event not to exceed $3,500,000 (the “Obligations”); (C) the payment of a portion of the costs incidental to the issuance of the Obligations, including issuance costs of the Obligations and any reserve funds as may be necessary to secure the Obligations; (D) the granting of certain other “financial assistance” (within the meaning of Section 854(14) of the Act) with respect to the foregoing, including potential exemptions from certain sales and use taxes, real property taxes, real estate transfer taxes and mortgage recording taxes (collectively with the Obligations, the “Financial Assistance”); and (E) the lease (with an obligation to purchase) or sale of the Project Facility to the Company or such other person as may be designated by the Company and agreed upon by the Issuer.

The Issuer is considering whether (A) to undertake the Project, (B) to finance the Project by issuing, from time to time, the Obligations, (C) to use the proceeds of the Obligations to pay the cost of undertaking the Project, together with necessary incidental costs in connection therewith, and (D) to provide certain exemptions from taxation with respect to the Project, including (1) exemption from mortgage recording taxes with respect to any documents, if any, recorded by the Issuer with respect to the Project in the office of the County Clerk of Madison County, New York or elsewhere, (2) exemption from deed transfer taxes on any real estate transfers, if any, with respect to the Project, (3) exemption from sales taxes relating to the acquisition, construction, renovation and installation of the Project Facility, and (4) in the event that the Project Facility would be subject to real property taxation if owned by the Company but shall be deemed exempt from real property taxation due to the involvement of the Issuer therewith, exemption from real property taxes (but not including special assessments and special ad valorem levies), if any, with respect to the Project Facility, subject to the obligation of the Company to make payments in lieu of taxes with respect to the Project Facility. If any portion of the Financial Assistance to be granted by the Issuer with respect to the Project is not consistent with the Issuer’s uniform tax exemption policy, the Issuer will follow the procedures for deviation from such policy set forth in Section 874(4) of the Act prior to granting such portion of the Financial Assistance.

If issuance of the Obligations is approved, interest on the Obligations will not be excludable from gross income for federal income tax purposes unless (A) pursuant to Section 147(f) of the Code and the regulations of the United States Treasury Department thereunder (the “Treasury Regulations”), the issuance of the Obligations is approved by the Board of Supervisors of Madison County, New York after the Issuer has held a public hearing on the nature and location of the Project Facility and the issuance of the Obligations; and (B) pursuant to Section 142(a)(7) of the Code, at least ninety-five percent (95%) of the net proceeds of the Obligations are used to provide a “qualified residential rental project” within the meaning of such quoted term in Section 142(d) of the Code.

If the Issuer determines to proceed with the Project and the issuance of the Obligations, (A) the Project Facility will be acquired, constructed, reconstructed and installed by the Issuer and will be leased (with an obligation to purchase) or sold by the Issuer to the Company or its designee pursuant to a project agreement (the “Agreement”) requiring that the Company or its designee make payments equal to debt service on the Obligations and make certain other payments and (B) the Obligations will be a special obligation of the Issuer payable solely out of certain of the proceeds of the Agreement and certain other assets of the Issuer pledged to the repayment of the Obligations. THE OBLIGATIONS SHALL NOT BE A DEBT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK OR MADISON COUNTY, NEW YORK, AND NEITHER THE STATE OF NEW YORK NOR MADISON COUNTY, NEW YORK SHALL BE LIABLE THEREON.

The Issuer has not yet made a determination pursuant to Article 8 of the Environmental Conservation Law (the “SEQR Act”) regarding the potential environmental impact of the Project.

The Issuer will at said time and place hear all persons with views on either the location, nature of the proposed Project, the Financial Assistance being contemplated by the Issuer in connection with the proposed Project or the proposed plan of financing the proposed Project by the issuance from time to time of the Obligations. A copy of the Application filed by the Company with the Issuer with respect to the Project, including an analysis of the costs and benefits of the Project, is available for public inspection during business hours at the offices of the Issuer. If the Issuer determines to issue any portion of the Bonds as federally tax-exempt obligations, a transcript or summary report of the hearing will be made available to the Board of Supervisors of Madison County, New York. Approval of the issuance of the Obligations by Madison County, New York, acting through its elected Board of Supervisors, is necessary in order for the interest on the Obligations to qualify for exemption from federal income taxation.

Additional information can be obtained from, and written comments may be addressed to: Kipp Hicks, Executive Director, Madison County Industrial Development Agency, 3215 Seneca Turnpike, Canastota, New York 13032; Telephone: (315) 697-9817.

Dated: August 25, 2016.


Farm It Out Produce

Notice is hereby given that a public hearing pursuant to Section 859-a(2) of the General Municipal Law of the State of New York (the “Act”) will be held by Madison County Industrial Development Agency (the “Agency”) on the 12th day of September, 2016 at 10:00 o’clock a.m., local time, at the Town Offices, 3849 Timmerman Road Canastota, in the Town of Lincoln, Madison County, New York in connection with the following matters:

Farm It Out Produce, Inc., a New York business corporation (the “Company”), has presented an application (the “Application”) to the Agency, a copy of which Application is on file at the office of the Agency, requesting that the Agency consider undertaking a project (the “Project”) for the benefit of the Company, said Project consisting of the following: (A) (1) the acquisition of an interest in an approximately 5 acre portion of an approximately 378.74 acre parcel of land currently with an address of 6666 Buyea Road in the Town of Lincoln, Madison County, New York (currently being a portion of tax map no. 53.-1-18.11) (the “Land”), (2) the construction on the Land of (a) an approximately 25,000 square foot greenhouse (the “Greenhouse”) and (b) an approximately 1,500 square foot facility adjoined to the Greenhouse (the “Addition” and collectively, with the Greenhouse, the “Facility”) and (3) the acquisition and installation therein and thereon of certain machinery and equipment (the “Equipment”) (the Land, the Facility and the Equipment being collectively referred to as the “Project Facility”), all of the foregoing to constitute a hydroponic greenhouse and other directly or indirectly related activities; (B) the granting of certain “financial assistance” (within the meaning of Section 854(14) of the Act) with respect to the foregoing, including potential exemptions from certain sales and use taxes, real property taxes, real estate transfer taxes and mortgage recording taxes (collectively, the “Financial Assistance”); and (C) the lease (with an obligation to purchase) or sale of the Project Facility to the Company or such other person as may be designated by the Company and agreed upon by the Agency.

The Agency is considering whether (A) to undertake the Project, and (B) to provide certain exemptions from taxation with respect to the Project, including (1) exemption from mortgage recording taxes with respect to any documents, if any, recorded by the Agency with respect to the Project in the office of the County Clerk of Madison County, New York or elsewhere, (2) exemption from deed transfer taxes on any real estate transfers, if any, with respect to the Project, (3) exemption from sales taxes relating to the acquisition, construction, renovation and installation of the Project Facility, and (4) in the event that the Project Facility would be subject to real property taxation if owned by the Company but shall be deemed exempt from real property taxation due to the involvement of the Agency therewith, exemption from real property taxes (but not including special assessments and special ad valorem levies), if any, with respect to the Project Facility, subject to the obligation of the Company to make payments in lieu of taxes with respect to the Project Facility. If any portion of the Financial Assistance to be granted by the Agency with respect to the Project is not consistent with the Agency’s uniform tax exemption policy, the Agency will follow the procedures for deviation from such policy set forth in Section 874(4) of the Act prior to granting such portion of the Financial Assistance.

If the Agency determines to proceed with the Project, the Project Facility will be acquired, constructed, reconstructed and installed by the Agency and will be leased (with an obligation to purchase) or sold by the Agency to the Company or its designee pursuant to a project agreement (the “Agreement”) requiring that the Company or its designee make certain payments to the Agency.

The Agency has not yet made a determination pursuant to Article 8 of the Environmental Conservation Law (the “SEQR Act”) regarding the potential environmental impact of the Project.

The Agency will at said time and place hear all persons with views on either the location, nature of the proposed Project, or the Financial Assistance being contemplated by the Agency in connection with the proposed Project. A copy of the Application filed by the Company with the Agency with respect to the Project, including an analysis of the costs and benefits of the Project, is available for public inspection during business hours at the offices of the Agency. A transcript or summary report of the hearing will be made available to the members of the Agency.

Additional information can be obtained from, and written comments may be addressed to: Kipp Hicks, Executive Director, Madison County Industrial Development Agency, 3215 Seneca Turnpike, Canastota, New York 13032; Telephone: (315) 697-9817.

Dated: August 25, 2016.

 

TOURISM RISES IN MADISON COUNTY & CENTRAL NEW YORK

 Following news of a study showing that travelers spent a record $62.5 billion in New York State last year, it was announced today that this same study shows traveler spending in the Central New York region rising 4.7% in 2014 to a total of $2.015 billion.

“This is terrific news,” said Kelly Blazosky, President of Oneida County Tourism and Chair of the Central New York Vacation Region, which includes Broome, Chenango, Herkimer, Madison, Montgomery, Oneida, Otsego and Schoharie counties. “It’s clear that visitors are choosing to come to Central New York and enjoying our attractions, restaurants, and shops. But what’s really important to note is that these travelers are supporting more than 35,800 jobs across the region.”

According to the study by Tourism Economics, the tourism industry generated $596 million in direct labor income in 2014. This figure climbs to $999.7 million when indirect and induced labor incomes are included. Tourism in Central New York yielded nearly $237.9 million in state and local taxes in 2014, saving the average household $786 in taxes that year.

“This study once again proves that tourism development is economic development,” said Blazosky. “That’s why we’re continually working to draw more visitors and their dollars to our region through award-winning campaigns like Brew Central and CNY Fresh.”

In Madison County, visitors spent $83.7 million in 2014, an increase of 3.6%. This spending generated $10.3 million in state and local taxes, which saved the average Madison County household $383 and sustained nearly 2,000 jobs in the county.

“Madison County is home to farm-to-table restaurants, charming shops, unique festivals and events, excellent colleges, cozy inns and farmstead bed & breakfasts. With all of these rich assets, it’s not surprising to see that tourism is leading local economic development,” said Joan Johnson, President of Madison County Tourism.

Johnson noted that the future of tourism in Madison County is bright with the upcoming arrivals of the Hampton Inn and Empire Farmstead Brewery in Cazenovia, the Center for Art and Culture in Hamilton plus many more developments across the county. “These projects will draw more visitors to the area, which will lead to the creation of jobs and tax savings for our residents,” said Johnson.

For More information on tourism in Central New York, visit www.justgocny.com. For more information on tourism in Madison County, call 315-684-7320 or visit www.MadisonTourism.com

Board Meeting Notice:

Richard Bargabos, Chairman, has called meetings of the Madison County CRC and IDA Boards for Thursday, July 16, 2015 at the Madison County Center for Economic Development in Canastota. Committee meetings will begin at 2:00 pm.

Public Hearing Notice: Madison County CRC

Notice is hereby given by Madison County Capital Resource Corporation (the “Issuer”) that a public hearing pursuant to Section 147(f) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), and, as required by the Issuer’s certificate of incorporation, Section 859-a of the General Municipal Law of the State of New York will be held by the Issuer on the 13 day of July, 2015 at 10:00 o’clock, a.m., local time, in the Oneida City Hall located at 109 North Main Street in the City of Oneida, New York, in connection with the following matters:

Oneida Health Systems, Inc. d/b/a Oneida Healthcare, a New York not-for-profit corporation (the “Borrower”), has submitted an application (the “Application”) to the Issuer, a copy of which Application is on file at the office of the Issuer, which Application requested that the Issuer consider undertaking a project (the “Project”) for the benefit of the Borrower, said Project consisting of the following: (A)(1) the financing of all or a portion of the costs of refinancing and/or refunding certain existing indebtedness incurred by or for the benefit of the Borrower (collectively, the “Prior Debt”) to finance and/or refinance various capital projects located at 321 Genesee Street and 221 Broad Street in the City of Oneida, Madison County, New York (collectively, the “Prior Project Facility”), said Prior Project Facility being operated by the Borrower as a health care facility and long term care facility and other directly and indirectly related uses; and (2) the financing of all or a portion of the costs of various improvements to the roof and replacement of windows to the buildings located on the Borrower’s campus located at 321 Genesee Street and 323 Genesee Street in the City of Oneida, Madison County, New York (the “Improvements”), (the Improvements and the Prior Project Facility being collectively referred to as the “Project Facility”); (B) the financing of all or a portion of the costs of the foregoing by the issuance of revenue bonds of the Issuer in one or more issues or series in an aggregate principal amount sufficient to pay the cost of undertaking the Project, together with necessary incidental costs in connection therewith, presently estimated to be an amount not to exceed $31,000,000 (the “Obligations”); (C) the payment of all or a portion of the costs incidental to the Obligations, including issuance costs of the Obligations and any reserve funds as may be necessary to secure the Obligations; and (D) the making of a loan (the “Loan”) of the proceeds of the Obligations to the Borrower or such other person as may be designated by the Borrower and agreed upon by the Issuer.

The Issuer is considering whether (A) to undertake the Project, (B) to finance the Project by issuing, from time to time, the Obligations, (C) to use the proceeds of the Obligations to pay the cost of undertaking the Project, together with necessary incidental costs in connection therewith, and (D) to provide certain exemptions from taxation with respect to the Project, including (1) exemption from mortgage recording taxes with respect to any documents, if any, recorded by the Issuer with respect to the Project in the office of the County Clerk of Madison County, New York or elsewhere, and (2) exemption from deed transfer taxes on any real estate transfers with respect to the Project, if any.

If issuance of the Obligations is approved, interest on the Obligations will not be excludable from gross income for federal income tax purposes unless (A) pursuant to Section 147(f) of the Code and the regulations of the United States Treasury Department thereunder (the “Treasury Regulations”), the issuance of the Obligations is approved by the Board of Supervisors of Madison County, New York after the Issuer has held a public hearing on the nature and location of the Project Facility and the issuance of the Obligations; and (B) pursuant to Section 145(a) of the Code, all property which is to be provided by the net proceeds of the Obligations is to be owned by a Section 501(c)(3) organization or a governmental unit and at least ninety-five percent (95%) of the net proceeds of the Obligations are used with respect to (1) governmental units and/or (2) the activities of Section 501(c)(3) organizations which do not constitute “unrelated trades or businesses” (as defined in Section 513(a) of the Code) with respect to such Section 501(c)(3) organizations.

If the Issuer determines to proceed with the Project and the issuance of the Obligations, (A) the proceeds of the Obligations will be loaned by the Issuer to the Borrower pursuant to a loan agreement (the “Agreement”) requiring that the Borrower or its designee make payments equal to debt service on the Obligations and make certain other payments to the Issuer and (B) the Obligations will be a special obligation of the Issuer payable solely out of certain of the proceeds of the Agreement and certain other assets of the Issuer pledged to the repayment of the Obligations. THE OBLIGATIONS SHALL NOT BE A DEBT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK OR MADISON COUNTY, NEW YORK, AND NEITHER THE STATE OF NEW YORK NOR MADISON COUNTY, NEW YORK SHALL BE LIABLE THEREON.

The Issuer has not yet made a determination pursuant to Article 8 of the Environmental Conservation Law (the “SEQR Act”) regarding the potential environmental impact of the Project.

The Issuer will at said time and place hear all persons with views on the location and nature of the proposed Project, the financial assistance being contemplated by the Issuer in connection with the proposed Project or the proposed plan of financing the proposed Project by the issuance from time to time of the Obligations. A copy of the Application filed by the Borrower with the Issuer with respect to the Project, including an analysis of the costs and benefits of the Project, is available for public inspection during business hours at the offices of the Issuer. A transcript or summary report of the hearing will be made available to the members of the board of directors of the Issuer and to the Board of Supervisors of Madison County, New York. Approval of the issuance of the Obligations by Madison County, New York, acting through its elected Board of Supervisors, is necessary in order for the interest on the Obligations to qualify for exemption from federal income taxation.

Additional information can be obtained from, and written comments may be addressed to: Kipp Hicks, Chief Executive Officer, Madison County Capital Resource Corporation, Madison County Center for Economic Development, 3215 Seneca Turnpike, Canastota, New York 13032; Telephone: 315-697-9817.

Dated: June 23, 2015.

Public Hearing Notice: Madison County CRC

Notice is hereby given by Madison County Capital Resource Corporation (the “Issuer”) that a public hearing pursuant to Section 147(f) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), and, as required by the Issuer’s certificate of incorporation, Section 859-a of the General Municipal Law of the State of New York will be held by the Issuer on the 13 day of July, 2015 at 11:00 o’clock, a.m., local time, at the Eaton Town Hall located at 35 Cedar Street in the Village of Morrisville, Town of Eaton, Madison County, New York, in connection with the following matters:

Morrisville College Foundation, Inc., a New York not-for-profit corporation (the “Borrower”), has submitted an application (the “Application”) to the Issuer, a copy of which Application is on file at the office of the Issuer, which Application requested that the Issuer consider undertaking a project (the “Project”) for the benefit of the Borrower, said Project consisting of the following: (A) (1) the refinancing, in whole, of the outstanding Civic Facility Revenue Bonds (Morrisville State College Foundation – Student Housing Project), Series 2005A in the original aggregate principal amount of $11,815,000 (the “Prior Series 2005 Bonds”) issued on or about June 23, 2005 by Madison County Industrial Development Agency (the “Prior Issuer”) and the outstanding Civic Facility Revenue Bonds (Commons II, LLC – Student Housing Project), Series 2008A in the original aggregate principal amount of $16,650,000 (the “Prior Series 2008 Bonds” and, collectively with the Prior Series 2005 Bonds, the “Prior Bonds”) issued on or about January 30, 2008 by the Prior Issuer, the proceeds of which Prior Bonds provided financing for two projects (collectively, the “Bond Project”) consisting of the following: (a) the acquisition of various interests in various parcels of land located on South Road and/or South Street in the Town of Eaton, Madison County, New York (collectively, the “Bond Land”), (b) the construction on the Bond Land of an approximately 80,000 square foot, 51 unit, 200 bed student housing facility and an approximately 90,000 square foot, 57 unit, 228 bed student housing facility and certain related improvements (collectively, the “Bond Facility”) and (c) the acquisition and installation therein and thereon of certain machinery and equipment (the “Bond Equipment”) (the Bond Land, the Bond Facility and the Bond Equipment hereinafter collectively referred to as the “Bond Project Facility”), all of the foregoing constituting student housing facilities operated by Morrisville Auxiliary of State University College of Agriculture and Technology at Morrisville, N.Y., Incorporated, a New York not-for-profit corporation (the “Manager”), and (d) the payment of a portion of the costs incidental to the issuance of the Prior Bonds, including issuance costs of the Prior Bonds and any reserve funds that were necessary to secure the Prior Bonds; and (2) the refinancing, in whole or in part, of the outstanding conventional loan (the “Prior Loan”) incurred by the Borrower to provide financing for a project (the “Loan Project”) (the Loan Project and the Bond Project being collectively referred to as the “Prior Project”) consisting of the following: (a) the construction, on an approximately 115 acre parcel of land (the “Loan Land”) located at 4414 Route 20 in the Town of Nelson, Madison County, New York approximately 3 miles west of the main campus of the State University College of Agriculture and Technology at Morrisville, N.Y. (a/k/a Morrisville State College) (the “College”), of an equine physiology and rehabilitation center (the “Loan Facility”) and (b) the acquisition and installation therein and thereon of certain machinery and equipment (the “Loan Equipment”) (the Loan Facility and the Loan Equipment being collectively referred to as the “Loan Project Facility”), all of the foregoing constituting a publicly accessible equine physical rehabilitation training center housing the College’s thoroughbred racing and equine physical rehabilitation programs; (B) the financing of all or a portion of the costs of the foregoing by the issuance of revenue bonds of the Issuer in one or more issues or series in an aggregate principal amount sufficient to pay the cost of undertaking the Project, together with necessary incidental costs in connection therewith, presently estimated to be an amount not to exceed $30,000,000 (the “Obligations”); (C) paying a portion of the costs incidental to the issuance of the Obligations, including issuance costs of the Obligations and any reserve funds as may be necessary to secure the Obligations; and (D) the making of a loan (the “Loan”) of the proceeds of the Obligations to the Borrower or such other person as may be designated by the Borrower and agreed upon by the Issuer.

The Issuer is considering whether (A) to undertake the Project, (B) to finance the Project by issuing, from time to time, the Obligations, (C) to use the proceeds of the Obligations to pay the cost of undertaking the Project, together with necessary incidental costs in connection therewith, and (D) to provide certain exemptions from taxation with respect to the Project, including (1) exemption from mortgage recording taxes with respect to any documents, if any, recorded by the Issuer with respect to the Project in the office of the County Clerk of Madison County, New York or elsewhere, and (2) exemption from deed transfer taxes on any real estate transfers with respect to the Project, if any.

If issuance of the Obligations is approved, interest on the Obligations will not be excludable from gross income for federal income tax purposes unless (A) pursuant to Section 147(f) of the Code and the regulations of the United States Treasury Department thereunder (the “Treasury Regulations”), the issuance of the Obligations is approved by the Board of Supervisors of Madison County, New York after the Issuer has held a public hearing on the nature and location of the Project Facility and the issuance of the Obligations; and (B) pursuant to Section 145(a) of the Code, all property which is to be provided by the net proceeds of the Obligations is to be owned by a Section 501(c)(3) organization or a governmental unit and at least ninety-five percent (95%) of the net proceeds of the Obligations are used with respect to (1) governmental units and/or (2) the activities of Section 501(c)(3) organizations which do not constitute “unrelated trades or businesses” (as defined in Section 513(a) of the Code) with respect to such Section 501(c)(3) organizations.

If the Issuer determines to proceed with the Project and the issuance of the Obligations, (A) the proceeds of the Obligations will be loaned by the Issuer to the Borrower pursuant to a loan agreement (the “Agreement”) requiring that the Borrower or its designee make payments equal to debt service on the Obligations and make certain other payments to the Issuer and (B) the Obligations will be a special obligation of the Issuer payable solely out of certain of the proceeds of the Agreement and certain other assets of the Issuer pledged to the repayment of the Obligations. THE OBLIGATIONS SHALL NOT BE A DEBT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK OR MADISON COUNTY, NEW YORK, AND NEITHER THE STATE OF NEW YORK NOR MADISON COUNTY, NEW YORK SHALL BE LIABLE THEREON.

The Issuer has determined that the Project constitutes a “Type II action”, as said quoted term is defined in the regulations issued pursuant to Article 8 of the Environmental Conservation Law (the “Regulations”), and accordingly that no environmental impact statement or any other determination or procedure is required under the Regulations regarding the potential environmental impact of the Project.

The Issuer will at said time and place hear all persons with views on the location and nature of the proposed Project, the financial assistance being contemplated by the Issuer in connection with the proposed Project or the proposed plan of financing the proposed Project by the issuance from time to time of the Obligations. A copy of the Application filed by the Borrower with the Issuer with respect to the Project, including an analysis of the costs and benefits of the Project, is available for public inspection during business hours at the offices of the Issuer. A transcript or summary report of the hearing will be made available to the members of the board of directors of the Issuer and to the Board of Supervisors of Madison County, New York. Approval of the issuance of the Obligations by Madison County, New York, acting through its elected Board of Supervisors, is necessary in order for the interest on the Obligations to qualify for exemption from federal income taxation.

Additional information can be obtained from, and written comments may be addressed to: Kipp Hicks, Chief Executive Officer, Madison County Capital Resource Corporation, Madison County Center for Economic Development, 3215 Seneca Turnpike, Canastota, New York 13032; Telephone: 315-697-9817.

Dated: June 23, 2015.

 

What’s New

MORE THAN $2.6 MILLION AWARDED TO TOURISM PROJECTS IN MADISON COUNTY

Economic Development Resources Awarded in Fourth Round of Regional Council Initiative

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo recently announced that $2,610,000 in economic and community development funding has been awarded to tourism-related entities in Madison County through Round IV of the Regional Economic Development Council (REDC) initiative.

This funding will be used to help build a hotel in Cazenovia, an arts museum and brewery in Hamilton, transform a commercial building in Nelson into an Agritourism-based destination and more.

“This is excellent news for Madison County,” said Dr. Joan Johnson, President of Madison County Tourism, which is the county’s official tourism promotion agency. ”I want to congratulate the award winners and thank them for their hard work, we are fortunate to have such spirited entrepreneurs in our community. I also want to thank Governor Cuomo, Senator Valesky, Assemblyman Magee and Chairman Becker for their efforts to bring this funding home. They truly recognize that tourism development is economic development”

Johnson noted that visitors spent nearly $81 million in Madison County in 2012, referencing data provided by Tourism Economics. According to Johnson, this spending generated $5.6 million in local taxes, which saved the average Madison County household $372 and sustained nearly 2,000 jobs in the county.

A centerpiece of the Governor’s strategy to jumpstart the economy and create jobs, the Regional Councils were established in 2011 to transform the State’s approach to economic development from a top-down model to one that is community-based and performance-driven. The initiative empowers community, business and academic leaders, as well as members of the public in each region of the state, to develop strategic plans specifically tailored to their region’s unique strengths and resources in order to create jobs, improve quality of life and grow the economy.

“These projects will not only draw more visitors to our county but they’ll also create new jobs,” said John M. Becker, Chairman of the Madison County Board of Supervisors. “These awards are just the latest examples of how Madison County is a great place to live, work and visit.”

“Madison County’s growing tourism economy will certainly be bolstered by this funding, and I was pleased to support it in the REDC process. From the burgeoning hops and craft brewery industry to additional hotels, this funding will enable the Madison County economy to grow,” State Senator David J. Valesky said.

“This investment recognizes New York’s diverse bounty and supports our farms and creates jobs by helping the area to become a more popular tourist destination. The blending of agriculture and tourism is crucial to successful economic development for Madison County and surrounding areas, and I’m grateful to Governor Cuomo and the REDC for this initiative,” Assemblyman Bill Magee said.

“Four years ago we decided to take a different approach on economic development – emphasizing cooperation and investing in local assets instead of continuing the State’s old and ineffective top-down mentality,” Governor Cuomo said. “That’s what the Regional Councils are all about, and today is proof that they are continuing to drive an economic renaissance in every region of the State. Each council presented bold ideas for how to create jobs and new opportunities in their communities, and I am proud to work with all of them to continue moving New York forward.”

The Madison County tourism-based entities awarded funding through the REDC are:

$1,280,000 – Cazenovia Hospitality, LLC

New Hotel Development

Construct an 80 room national chain hotel and conference space, which could accommodate up to 300 people, indoor pool, fitness center, breakfast area and business center in Cazenovia.

$750,000 – Colgate University

Center for Art and Culture

The proposed project is the relocation of two Colgate University museums to a newly constructed 25,880 square foot Center for Art and Culture in downtown Hamilton, strengthening the synergy between the University and the local community. Currently, the Picker Art Gallery and the Longyear Museum of Anthropology are located on campus and function as separate and distinct entities. Both occupy outdated facilities with little public exposure, and neither is easily accessible. This project will bring the museums into the heart of the Hamilton community

$350,000 – Good Nature Brewing, Inc.

New Farm Brewery Facility

Good Nature Brewing, Inc. will construct a new 4000ft brewery including indoor/outdoor retail and event space for tours, classes, public/private events, as well as to renovate an existing 3500ft structure for use as warehouse and office space. Outdoor space will enable the facility to offer entertainment, open air markets, a demonstration “Beer Garden” and more.

 $200,000 – Owera Vineyards (EBAC, LLC)

Phase 2 Facility Expansion

Expansion of the Owera Farm Winery, including enclosure and expansion of a tented winery promotion area to enable 12-month operation, enhancing regional tourism.

$30,000 – Twenty East, LLC

Building Redevelopment for Agritourism based Destination

Twenty East will feature the extensive renovation of a commercial building and transform it into a unique Agritourism based destination.

In addition to the above $2,610,000 in funding, $500,000 was awarded to Oneida County Tourism on behalf of the Central New York Vacation Region, which includes Madison County, to market Brew Central—a collaborative campaign to promote Central New York as America’s Premier Craft Brew Destination. The campaign will target domestic markets across NY, PA, NJ, CT, VT, MA and the international markets of Canada, the UK and Germany.

For more information, call Madison County Tourism at 684-7320; for a full list of REDC awards, visit

https://www.governor.ny.gov/sites/governor.ny.gov/files/atoms/files/REDCAwardsBooklet2014.pdf.

 

 

Governor Cuomo Announces $94 Million Awarded for Solar Projects Across the State

142 Solar Projects at Businesses and Schools Will Increase New York’s Solar Capacity by 68 Percent

Albany, NY (September 26, 2014)
Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced NY-Sun awards for large solar electric projects that will increase the solar capacity in New York State by more than 214 megawatts, a 68 percent increase over the amount of solar installed and in the pipeline at the end of 2013. The competitive awards further advance the scale-up of solar and move the State closer to a sustainable, self-sufficient solar industry.

 “Today we are making another long-term investment in our clean energy economy – with nearly $100 million in funding that will dramatically increase our capacity to generate and utilize solar energy across the state,” Governor Cuomo said. “New York is quickly becoming a national leader in renewable energy by building a competitive solar industry, and today’s award recipients are an example of how that progress continues to grow. As we recognize Climate Week, this is a significant step forward in our goal of creating a better place for New Yorkers to live and work, and I look forward to seeing these projects contribute to a cleaner environment.”

 The new capacity, which is planned for 142 project sites, was obtained through the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority’s Competitive PV program, which has been working to stimulate the market for systems larger than 200 kilowatts for four years. A total of $94 million in renewable funding for these projects leverages private investment of $375 million in new PV power infrastructure projects.

 A total of 50 project sites are located at businesses; 41 at schools and school districts; 36 at municipal and other government facilities; and 15 at nonprofits, health care institutions and colleges.

 “The results of this solicitation highlight the success of Governor Cuomo’s NY-Sun initiative in driving a significant increase in solar power in the State, and the large interest from school districts is an indicator of the success we can expect from NY-Sun’s new K-Solar program, which focuses specifically on solar projects at schools,” said John B. Rhodes, President and CEO, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. “NY-Sun is mobilizing private investment in this clean renewable resource as New York State continues to build clean energy systems that are resilient, reliable and affordable.”

The responses to this solicitation demonstrate that New York State has become an increasingly attractive solar market. A total of 49 developers submitted proposals, a marked increase over the previous two solicitations. The latest bids included large solar developers that have previously focused on other states, regions and countries, and that submitted bids to New York State for the first time.

 In addition, proposed average project sizes continued to increase steeply, more than doubling from 750 kilowatts a year ago to more than 1.8 megawatts with the latest solicitation. Aggregate bid prices for awarded projects declined sharply from about a year ago — from $1 per watt to 55 cents per watt in Con Edison territory and from 68 cents per watt to 41 cents per watt in the rest of the state. This will result in 1.6 times more solar energy generated per ratepayer dollar than about a year ago.

 Strong response from developers has continued with projects in strategic locations where the installation of new solar systems is expected to provide benefits to the electric distribution system. Five awarded projects went beyond solar, integrating energy efficiency and energy storage into their bids, an option available for the first time.

 Many of the sites receiving awards will use remote net metering, which allows eligible renewable energy system owners that produce more energy than they consume at one location annually to accrue credits that can be used to offset other electric accounts under their name.

 “The NY-Sun awards announced by Governor Cuomo underscore the tremendous strides that are being made to greatly increase the amount of clean solar electricity capacity in New York State,” said Gil C. Quiniones, President and Chief Executive Officer of New York Power Authority. “The competitive photovoltaic program leading to these awards also reflects a strategic approach for lowering solar power costs and spurring the private sector’s investments in this clean renewable power source.”

 The New York Power Authority continues to work closely with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to bring about further integration of solar power through initiatives to reduce solar costs.  This includes a newly introduced K-Solar Program, in partnership with the New York State Education Department.

 Under the NY-Sun Competitive PV Program, installers submit proposals for funding based on commitments from companies interested in having PV installed at their sites and the proposed incentive for each PV project. Installers receiving awards can be found HERE.

 NUMBER OF PLANNED PROJECT SITES BY REGION:

 New York City There are 32 projects sites in New York City: three in the Bronx, 10 in Brooklyn, four in Manhattan, 10 in Queens and five in Staten Island – including 24 public schools across the five boroughs.

 Hudson Valley

There are 23 project sites in the Hudson Valley: one in Dutchess County, four in Orange County, one in Putnam County, two in Rockland County, two in Sullivan County and 13 in Westchester County – including President Container in Middletown and Dutchess County Airport.

 Capital Region

There are 18 project sites in the Capital Region: two in Albany County, five in Columbia County, two in Rensselaer County, six in Saratoga County, and one each in Schenectady, Warren and Washington counties — including the Town of Moreau Industrial Park, Town of Halfmoon, Mohawk Fine Paper in Cohoes, Environment One Corp. in Niskayuna and Emma Willard School in Troy.

 Mohawk Valley

There are 20 project sites in the Mohawk Valley: one in Fulton County, six in Herkimer County, seven in Oneida County, one in Otsego County and five in Schoharie County – including three sites in the City of Utica, one site at the Oneida County Sheriff’s Office and one site in the City of Amsterdam.

 North Country

There are six project sites in the North Country: one in Clinton County, three in Jefferson County and two in St. Lawrence County – including ConMed Corp. in Philadelphia (Jefferson County), Ogdensburg Bridge and Port Authority, and Plattsburgh Airport.

 Southern Tier

There are eight project sites in the Southern Tier, two in Broome County and six in Tompkins County — including Volcraft of NY in Chemung, Vanguard Printing in Ithaca and the Ithaca Thompkins Regional  Airport.

 Central New York

There are 13 project sites in Central New York: one in Cortland County, three in Madison County, seven in Onondaga County and two in Oswego County – including the Liverpool School District (Onondaga County), Onondaga County and ConMed Corp. in Sullivan (Madison County).

 Finger Lakes

There are 13 project sites in the Finger Lakes: one in Genesee County, one in Livingston County, six in Monroe County, four in Ontario County and one in Wayne County – including Hobart and William Smith College and the Avon Central School District in Avon (Livingston County).

 Western New York

There were nine project sites in Western New York: two in Cattaraugus County and seven in Erie County – including the Buffalo-Niagara Medical Campus in Buffalo.

 This is expected to be the final solicitation under the Competitive PV program. Plans are under development to incorporate projects larger 200 MW into the recently announced statewide NY-Sun Incentive Program starting in 2015 through a proven MW block system approach that is responsive to changing market conditions, allowing the solar market in each region of the state to grow at its own pace. The NY-Sun Incentive Program strategically deploys public funds to drive industry to scale and reduce burdens on ratepayers.

 NY-Sun is part of Governor Cuomo’s commitment to protect the environment, grow the clean energy economy and lower energy costs for all New Yorkers. It is a dynamic public-private partnership to drive growth in the solar industry and make solar technology more affordable. Since Governor Cuomo launched NY-Sun in 2012, a total of 316 MW of solar electric has been installed or is under contract, more than was installed in the entire prior decade. The NY-Sun initiative brings together and expands existing programs administered by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, Long Island Power Authority, PSEG Long Island, and the New York Power Authority, to ensure a coordinated, well-funded solar energy expansion plan and a transition to a sustainable, self-sufficient solar industry.

 With this initiative, New York’s role as a leader and first mover in shaping the future of energy remains firmly in place. By developing innovative market solutions, the State is delivering on Governor Cuomo’s commitment to transform the energy industry into a more resilient, clean, cost-effective and dynamic system. Working with State, citizen and industry stakeholders, New York’s energy policy is moving to a more market-based, decentralized approach. This means preserving the environment, decreasing energy costs, and creating opportunities for economic growth for current and future generations of New Yorkers. In advancing these new energy systems and solutions, New Yorkers will have improved energy affordability and efficiency without sacrificing the ability to live in a cleaner, resilient and more sustainable environment

Central New York lands $103.7 million in state economic development money

Published: Thursday, December 08, 2011, 7:41 PM Updated: Friday, December 09, 2011, 7:47 AMBy Charles McChesney / The Post-Standard

Albany, NY — The region’s economic development officials got more than they hoped for from a trip to Albany Thursday, bringing home $103.7 million in state economic development funds.

Rob Simpson, president of CenterState CEO and co-chair of the Central New York Regional Economic Development Council, said he was “thrilled” with the announcement. Members of the council have been meeting since July hammering out a list of projects that they thought could best improve the region that includes Onondaga, Oswego, Cayuga, Madison and Cortland counties.

The council’s plan included 30 projects and requests for $40 million in state funding. The state delivered $63.7 million more, including $14 million to renovate apartments in Lysander.

The extra millions came as a surprise. Council members had heard there was more money available from other state sources, but didn’t know the other projects were going to be included Thursday, said Syracuse University Chancellor Nancy Cantor, co-chair of the CNYREDC.

The announcement came at an Albany ceremony capping a process Gov. Andrew Cuomo laid out earlier this year.

The state was divided into 10 regions with an economic development council for each. The councils reviewed projects and chose which to include in a plan. The separate regional plans were presented last month to a state committee that chose four as “best plan awardees.”

The North Country, Western New York and Long Island were chosen, along with Central New York, as the best.

Cuomo had said each of the winners would get $40 million while the remaining six regions would split $40 million between them.

Financial news host Maria Bartiromo, emcee for Thursday’s event, introduced videos for each region, then announced that each had been awarded millions in grants, far more than the $200 million Cuomo had talked of. In all, awards of $785 million were announced.

The money came from the $200 million in targeted regional money and from an additional $800 million in money for which companies, housing authorities, non-profits and others had filed state consolidated funding applications.

Good as the news was for Central New York, it appeared that not every project chosen by the local council received state funding. Five projects – including those that would have renovated the Abbott House in Aurora and assisted in expansions at Dupli Envelope and Graphics, Ephesus Technologies, Champlain Valley Specialty Food and Healthway Home Products – did not make the final list.

Dennis Nett / The Post-StandardThe Central New York Regional Economic Development Council’s largest single money request is for more than $5 million to complete work at the CNY Biotechnology Research Center at the former Kennedy Square apartments.

“If the project is not on there, it means it isn’t funded,” said Austin Shafran, spokesman for Empire State Development. Shafran said regional technical factors could keep a project from getting funding, even it was part of a winning plan.

One factor was how quickly the project would yield new jobs. “We’re ready to create jobs in the short term, for the long term,” he said.

Among the projects that were backed by the regional council and did land funding were:

  • 3 million for work to the Syracuse’s Inner Harbor.
  • $3 million to equip space at the Syracuse Center of Excellence.
  • $1.95 million to continue work at the Central New York Biotechnology Research Center and the nearby land.
  • $150,000 to build a demonstration greenhouse in Madison County.
  • $994,000 to help expand a winery in Cazenovia.
  • More than $4 million in support for a dairy cooperative’s plan to build a plant in Cayuga County.
  • $349,000 for expansion at the Fulton Companies in Oswego Counties.

Projects that had not been announced before included $14 million – the largest single award in Central New York – to renovate 208 apartments at Greenway in Radisson.

Greenway Apartments rents to people who make less than 80 percent of the area’s median income. Many tenants make less than 60 percent, said Arthur Loomis, a consultant for Liberty Affordable Housing, a Rome-based non-profit taking control of the facility.

“It’s shovel ready,” Loomis said. “The complex, while in good shape, is tired and needs updating. It’s going to be like a brand-new project.” Improvements include new siding, windows and sidewalks, as well as renovated kitchens and bathrooms, Loomis said. Much of the infrastructure hasn’t been updated since the complex was built in the mid-1970s, he said. The residents’ income doesn’t make it possible to renovate extensively without public help, he said.

Renovations to Centerville Court Apartments in North Syracuse won $3,349,255 in state support while efforts to buy and renovate James Street Apartments in Syracuse got $9 million.

In Cayuga County, some $400,000 was announced for the Howland Stone Store Museum in the hamlet of Sherwood. That money is to restore “Opendore,” once home to the Howland family.

In Madison County, the state added $75,000 to provide emergency repairs to the homes of low-income, elderly residents.

In Oswego County, Grassman Energy was awarded $716,500 toward its efforts to begin design and manufacturing of wind turbines of the sort that can be seen at Carousel Center and atop the State University College at Oswego.

Before the winners were announced, Cuomo explained that the regional approach was part of a two-part effort to create jobs in New York.

The first part, he said, was improving the state’s image by improving the reality for business. That meant removing obstacles to job creation.

The second was giving the state’s region more say over what sort of development should be encouraged. “There is no single New York economy,” he said. “You know your strengths; you know your niche.”

Cuomo was joined at the ceremony by Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos and Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver. The three said separately that they were so pleased with how the process worked that they had already agreed to fund a similar effort next year.

“Three minutes – I’ve never had as short a conversation to get anything done,” Cuomo said of the backstage discussion with Skelos and Silver.

Contact Charles McChesney at [email protected] Contact Doug Dowty at [email protected] grants announced;

Central New York receiving $103.7 million

Thursday, December 8, 2011

By CAITLIN TRAYNOR
Dispatch Staff Writer
Twitter.com/DispatchCaitlin

ALBANY — The Central New York region presented the most compelling strategic plans for economic growth and job creation and was awarded the most funding out of the 10 Regional Economic Development Councils in the state.

Several projects in Oneida County were selected, too.

Governor Andrew Cuomo organized an initiative in July, splitting the state into 10 regional councils tasked with composing competitive strategic plans to spur economic development and Thursday announced how the $785 million in state funds set aside for the endeavor would be divided.

The Central New York region, which includes Madison County, will receive $103.7 million to support 74 projects. It tops the list for funding.

The council’s plan focused on strengthening core industries and the region’s unique economic assets, including clean energy and environmental systems, health and financial services, agribusiness and food processing, advanced manufacturing and tourism.

More than $1.7 million will be dedicated to projects in Madison County. Owera Vineyards will receive the largest portion of that – $994,000 – to establish a new winery and community farm on 58 acres in Cazenovia. The money will purchase machinery and equipment, complete site improvements to support wine production, tasting, tours and other tourism and agribusiness events.

More than $250,000 will be used toward the establishment of a beef farmer’s cooperative facility and $200,000 will go toward creating a Microenterprise Grant Program that will assist at least six businesses. Johnson Brothers Lumber will get a $150,000 share to construct a greenhouse and aquaculture facility at the ARE Park as an add-on to its lumber-drying kilns.

Stoneleigh Housing will get $75,000 for emergency housing repairs for low income elderly homeowners and $47,700 will go toward leadership and general business skill training for 36 Marquardt Switches employees.

Additionally, under the Mohawk Valley regional council, Madison County will receive another $42,000 for entry level employment training for 45 adults in the manufacturing industry.

Madison County Industrial Development Agency Executive Director Kipp Hicks was pleased with the level of funding the county was awarded, calling the money a catalyst to allow the projects to advance. Speaking to the regional council’s distinction of receiving the most funding, Hicks said it’s a testament of how well the region collaborated for the project.

With top industries outlined in the region’s strategic plan, Hicks said Madison County’s economic initiatives encompass all of them.

“The entire state found out what we know already,” Senator David Valesky said. “That Central New York has the vision, talent and enormous potential to be a major economic force in New York State. This is a real game-changer for the region.”

The Mohawk Valley regional council was awarded $60.2 million. Included in that are several projects in Oneida County including $703,500 to build and maintain a fiber optic network from Herkimer to Vernon.

Griffiss International Airport will receive $2.7 million for rehabilitation of a 28,000 square foot hangar building that will service commercial aircraft. Griffiss Local Development Corporation will take $350,000 to renovate another hanger into a manufacturing site for a defense contractor.

Griffiss Utility Services Corporation, in the Griffiss Business and Technology Park was awarded $1.5 million to allow the company to use biomass resources to generate steam and electricity for the park customers. The Griffiss Economic Development Corporation was given $397,500 for a cybersecurity accelerator.

Oneida County in general was awarded $750,000 for housing rehabilitation for seniors. The money will be used to renovate 26 the homes of low and moderate income residents in the county.

At the announcement of the regional awards, Cuomo said “regional collaboration and planning is a roadmap to get New Yorkers back to work.

“The plans submitted by all 10 regions were truly extraordinary. For the first time we are putting the power of the state government behind the innovation of our people, giving them the tools to rebuild our economy.”

 

More local on tap: couple working to open Madison County’s first brewery in Hamilton

Published: Tuesday, September 06, 2011, 6:59 AM
By Alaina Potrikus / The Post-Standard

The idea came to Carrie Blackmore and Matt Whalen over a pint at the Colgate Inn.”Person after person came in asking what was local on tap,” Whalen said.There were some regional brews, including Cooperstown’s Ommegang and Saranac from Utica.But Whalen, an avid home brewer, thought there might be room for something even more local.

This month, the couple are moving their brainstorm into a storefront on Milford Street in the village of Hamilton, in hopes of having their first customers by Jan. 1.Good Nature Brewing will be the first brewery in Madison County – and will use hops from Foothill Hops in Munnsville, the county’s first commercial hops farm in 50 years.

The brewery will be just a few miles from the Bouckville field where the state’s first recorded hop crop was planted in 1808 by James Coolidge, a Massachusetts native who saw economic potential in the plant used to bitter beer and flavor other products. By 1880, Madison County was one of three counties in the state producing 80 percent of the country’s hops.”Nobody knows that,” Whalen said.

Large-scale production was killed by disease, competition and Prohibition in the early 1900s. But local advocates have come together in recent years to promote the area’s hop houses, farms and breweries much like the concentration of wineries in the Finger Lakes region.

Whalen plans to start with a two-barrel system, with an annual production of 200 barrels, and expand in the next three years to a 10 barrel system, bumping production to 2,000 barrels a year.

While Whalen focuses on the brewing, Blackmore has been handling the logistics of starting a business – permitting, licenses and location.

The couple met while teaching at North Country School in the Adirondacks. Blackmore grew up in the Bronx and studied history at Colgate University. Whalen grew up in Camillus and attended Paul Smith’s College.They fell in love after leaving the district and moved back to Central New York with hopes of starting a business together.

The brewery’s name – Good Nature Brewing – came to Whalen while weeding a bed of squash at Alambria Springs Farm in Lebanon.”I thought that what we were trying to do would be a good natured thing,” he said.They’ve geared their flagship recipes to incorporate the hops varietals grown by Kate and Larry Fisher at Foothill Hops.”The beer will have a very Madison County terroir,” Blackmore said, smiling as she used the French word used to describe the way specific places influence flavor.

The local ingredients don’t stop there. One of their neighbors on Milford Avenue is a screenprinter, who has already made T-shirts and will be printing their glassware. They’ve reached out to a cabinet maker in Norwich to design and produce their tap handles. A Colgate University graduate designed their logo.”We are committed to it,” Blackmore said of the local sourcing. “We want to grow the business by working in a symbiotic way.”

Excitement for the venture has resulted in a variety of financial support.A micro-enterprise loan through Madison County provided the $35,000 in seed money to purchase their equipment. The low-interest loan will turn into a grant if the company hires a low- to moderate-income employee within a year.The couple also sold memberships, which were quickly embraced by members of the community.”People who don’t even know us have been reaching out to collaborate,” Blackmore said. “It’s exciting.”

Upcoming events
What: 16th annual Madison County Hop Fest
When: 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sept. 17.
Where: Madison County Historical Society, 435 Main St., Oneida.
Details: Free workshops and exhibits, a food and beer pairing ($15 advance, $20 at the door) and a beer sampling featuring more than 30 styles ($25 advance, $30 at the door).
For more information: mchs1900.org/hopfest..

On tap
These are some of the brews that will be on tap when Good Nature Brewing opens to the public, possibly early next year. Brewer Matt Whalen is also working on a recipe to be called “The Nor’Easter,” and a Nut Brown Ale.
American Pale Ale: Brewed with three malts and two kinds of hops, it is a well-balanced and full-bodied beer with a fruity nose, hints of pine and grapefruit and a malty, caramel finish.
India Pale Ale: The whole leaf Chinook and Cascade hops grown at Foothill Hops in Munnsville give this ale a very floral, citrus and local taste.
Chicory Mocha Porter: Chicory root is often used as a coffee substitute and is found growing wild all over Central New York. Lightly hopped for a nice balance, with locally grown Perle hops.
Find out more at goodnaturebrewing.com.

 

Council Will Drive Local Economic Development and Improve Business Climate Statewide Central New York Regional Council to be Led by Nancy Cantor & Rob Simpson

Albany, NY (July 26, 2011)

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today launched his Central New York Regional Economic Development Council, which will redesign the relationship between the state government and businesses to stimulate regional economic development and create jobs statewide. The Governor was joined by Lieutenant Governor Robert Duffy, local officials, business leaders, and community members to launch the Regional Council at the Convention Center at OnCenter in Syracuse.

The Central New York Regional Council will be led by Nancy Cantor, the Chancellor of Syracuse University, and Rob M. Simpson, President of CenterState CEO, who will both serve as Regional Co-Chairs. The Regional Council will coordinate the economic development of Cayuga, Cortland, Madison, Onondaga, Oswego counties. A complete list of members of the Central New York Regional Council is included below.

“For too long, Albany has imposed one-size-fits-all economic development plans across the state, ignoring the unique assets and challenges of each region,” Governor Cuomo said. “Today, we are taking a new approach. With the Regional Councils, we will empower individual areas like Central New York to chart their own course for job creation and growth and we will send a clear message that New York is open for business.”

The Regional Councils represent a fundamental shift in the state’s approach to economic development, from a top-down development model to a community-based approach that emphasizes regions’ unique assets, harnesses local expertise, and empowers each region to set plans and priorities.

Currently, New York State’s economic development efforts are managed through dozens of separate state and local agencies. The Regional Councils will now bring together stakeholders in every region of the state to serve as a coordinated point of contact for economic development. Each Regional Council will be chaired by Lieutenant Governor Robert Duffy and will be led by two Regional Co-Chairs from the business and academic community. Additional membership is comprised of local leaders from business, academia, labor, agriculture, nonprofits, and community-based organizations.

Each Regional Council will develop a plan for the development of their region. The state will work with the Regional Councils to align state resources and policies, eliminate unnecessary barriers to growth and prosperity, and streamline the delivery of government services and programs to help the Regional Councils carry out their plans for development.

Governor Cuomo has already made historic changes to the state’s economic development grant application process to support the Regional Councils. Through a new Consolidated Funding Application that combines resources from dozens of existing programs, the Regional Councils can now apply for $1 billion in state funding for projects they determine to be part of their regional strategy.

Lieutenant Governor Robert Duffy said, “Governor Cuomo’s groundbreaking economic development strategy will put our state back on the right path. Only by focusing on what our regions actually need can we take full advantage of our resources and keep businesses and jobs here in New York. The Regional Councils will enable every section of the state to prepare individualized economic plans and will make the regions the drivers of their own success.”

Empire State Development President, CEO & Commissioner Kenneth Adams said, “New York can no longer afford to have the worst business climate in the nation. The economic development strategies of Albany’s past have failed to solve the challenges we face today. Governor Cuomo’s Regional Councils create a more efficient business model that empowers individual regions to determine what is best for their own communities and incentivizes thoughtful economic policies through competition. I am excited to work with every region to maximize their potential and bring investment and jobs to New York State.”

Nancy Cantor, Chancellor of Syracuse University and Co-Chair of the Central New York Regional Council, said, “Governor Cuomo’s regional approach is exactly what we need to jumpstart growth and create jobs. Our Regional Economic Development Council will take cross-sector collaboration to a whole new level by leveraging the expansive array of public-private partnerships we’ve been forging throughout the region and tapping Central New York’s strengths. I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to work with Rob Simpson and all the exceptional community and business leaders who are already collaborating in unprecedented ways to remake our regional economy.”

Rob M. Simpson, President of CenterState CEO and Co-Chair of the Central New York Regional Council, said, “Governor Cuomo’s regional plan recognizes that New York’s economy is as diverse as its citizens and too complex for Albany to take on alone. The challenges and opportunities facing Central New York are unique and require more than one-size fits all investments by the state. By engaging our region’s business, academic and public sector partners, the Governor will get the best from Central New York and we will be a vibrant contributor to New York’s overall economic health. I applaud the Governor’s leadership on this and look forward to working together to forge a more business-friendly Empire State.”

The ten Regional Councils cover the Capital Region, Central New York, Finger Lakes, Long Island, Mid-Hudson, Mohawk Valley, New York City, North Country, Southern Tier, and Western New York.

To learn more about the Regional Councils, please visit www.nyopenforbusiness.com

 

The Business Review

Date: Wednesday, August 3, 2011,

New York has been ranked No. 1 by the State Entrepreneurship Index, a state-by-state measurement of entrepreneurial activity.

New York has been ranked first in the nation for entrepreneurial activity, according to the State Entrepreneurship Index, a state-by-state measurement of entrepreneurial activity.

South Carolina was ranked last.

The index, developed by economists at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Bureau of Business Research and Department of Economics, evaluated the following components: a state’s percentage growth and per capita growth in business establishments, its business formation rate, the number of patents per thousand residents, and gross receipts of sole proprietorships and partnerships per capita.

Each state was assigned a ranking based on the state’s performance compared to the nationwide average.

For 2010, the latest year for figures, New York topped the list, scoring 2.34, thanks to its strong performance in gross receipts per capita and substantial improvement in two other components: growth in establishments and establishments per capita. Washington, with a score of 2.17, Massachusetts, with a score of 2.04, and New Jersey and Oregon, both scoring 1.93, rounded out the top five.

New York ranked No. 1 in 2008 as well, the last time the list was compiled.

Oregon rose the most in the rankings, up 40 positions to No. 5. Nevada fell the most, down 40 positions to No. 47.

The State Entrepreneurial Index combines detailed data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the IRS Statistics of Income Bulletin, the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Statistical Abstract.

 

America’s Best Affordable Places, 2011

By Venessa Wong and Jennifer Prince, Bloomberg Businessweek

May 27, 2011

No. 6: Onondaga County, New York
Population: 455,912
Median family income: $65,458
Households spending more than 30 percent income on housing: 26.4 percent
Unemployment: 8.2 percent
Adult population with bachelor’s degrees: 31.5 percent
Major cities: Syracuse, Salina, Clay

With a cost of living about 18 percent below the U.S. average, according to Sperling’s BestPlaces, Syracuse is an affordable city. While its population shrank slightly in the past 10 years, according to 2010 U.S. Census data, other areas in the county have grown, including Pompey, Cicero, and Lysander. Upstate University Health System and Syracuse University are among the area’s major employers, according to the county website.

Bloomberg Businessweek’s America’s Best Affordable Places 2011

 

Madison County moving forward with Agriculture and Renewable Energy Business Park

March 24, 2011

By CAITLIN TRAYNOR
Dispatch Staff Writer

WAMPSVILLE — Madison County’s Planning and Solid Waste committees gathered Thursday morning to divvy up the next wave of responsibilities in the development of the Agriculture and Renewable Energy Business Park.

The ARE Park has been has been in development since 2009. The Madison County IDA and Solid Waste Department have largely spearheaded the project, with the help of environmental lawyer Bill Buchan and engineering firm Barton & Loguidice.

The park is slated for construction at the Madison County landfill site. The landfill sits on 600 acres projections outlined in the landfill’s 100-year plan estimate that it will use 100 acres in that time period. The ARE Park would use another 150 acres, land that will be placed back on the tax rolls as it’s purchased by businesses.

The county allocated more than $700,000 for the planning and engineering stages of the project. IDA Executive Director Kipp Hicks said by the end of 2010, about half of that money had been used for things like formulating the feasibility of installing infrastructure services like water and sewer.

Buchan updated the committees on the progress that has been made on the project and what still needs to be done. He said the county has worked with the town of Lincoln’s zoning board to transfer use of the county’s landfill land to the business park. An overall land description has been done along with land surveys.

Several options for water service to the business park have been lined up. The Onondaga County Water Authority, which currently operates water lines in the county as close to the landfill as Canastota, remains a possibility. Hicks said it the OCWA has the capacity to serve water to the park but that expansion wouldn’t happen within the next three years.

Tapping local ground water may also be a viable option. Water testing has shown that there is the necessary quality and quantity of water available.

Residents in the town of Lincoln may be given the option to tie into water mains servicing the ARE Park, but Buchan explained that property in agricultural district would be required to “opt out” of the district. The same would be true for sewer.

The city of Oneida may be the most viable option for sewer services when considering distance and cost, Buchan said. Depending on the type of business that could potentially move into the ARE Park, waste water containing contaminants stronger than domestic waste may need to be treated on site before being sent to Oneida.

The second option would be to make an agreement with the village of Canastota. All sewer options would involve the creation of a sewer district that may allow for single users along the system to connect.

In other aspects of the project, the State Environmental Quality Review is underway. A positive declaration – meaning the project will have a significant impact on the surrounding environment – was made. A Generic Environmental Impact Statement is now being drafted. The public comment period to gather input on the scope of that statement ends Friday. The public will be given a second comment period once the statement is complete. Buchan estimated that that process would take about a year.

Nearly a decade before plans for the business park surfaced, the county began planning what to do with methane gas being emitted from the landfill to limit environmental concerns. A methane gas-to-electricity system has been in place for about two years. Hicks explained that the county has right-of-first-refusal on the electricity produced from the landfill while the rest is put into the grid. In conjunction with that project, Johnson Brothers Lumber, a local company based in Cazenovia, will establish a location on two acres at the landfill and use the excess heat produced from the methane-to-electricity system to heat lumber-drying kilns.

A contract with the company is expected to be signed by May, Hicks said. He was confident that the arraignment would provide an anchor for potential recruitment of businesses to the ARE Park. Johnson Brothers Lumber will not be part of the ARE Park. While some companies have expressed interesting in opening locations at the ARE Park, Hicks explained that it would be difficult to actively recruit tenants before water and sewer services are established.

A completion date for the ARE Park is not set yet. At the joint meeting, the two committees, the Planning Department and IDA divvied up tasks to move the project forward. The Solid Waste Committee, along with the Solid Waste Department will continue work on the sewer line and the county’s agreement with Johnson Brothers. The Planning Department was delegated to work on the remaining four issues: SEQR, water service development, land transfer and business recruitment. The IDA will also assist in the last two.

Ranking finds health in Madison County far superior to neighboring CNY counties

March 30, 2011
By The Associated Press The Post-Standard

Startling differences in the health of residents living just a few miles apart are highlighted in a new health rankings report that assesses wellness in nearly all the nation’s 3,000-plus counties.

A typical example is in Central New York, where Madison County was ranked the 16th healthiest county in New York. Next door, Onondaga County was ranked the 40th healthiest of the state’s 62 counties. Oswego County came in 41st, Cayuga County 38th, and Oneida County 53rd, according to the rankings, which were released Wednesday by the University of Wisconsin’s Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Putnam County is considered the healthiest in New York, and Bronx is the least healthy, according to the rankings.

“Affluent suburbs tend to have higher paying jobs, often in the cities, whereas rural communities often are dealing with loss of businesses” and declining populations of young people, who tend to be healthier, said Dr. Patrick Remington, a researcher at the University of Wisconsin’s Population Health Institute.

Residents of rural communities also tend to have less education, less access to health care, and higher rates of substance abuse and smoking – all factors that contribute to the rankings.

Still, counties encompassing big cities aren’t immune. Wyandotte County, Kansas learned that when the researchers released their widely publicized first county health rankings report last year.

The county includes Kansas City and boasts two major medical centers, which officials figured would mean a top ranking. But Joe Reardon, mayor and CEO of Kansas City and county government, said the county’s listing – 96th out of 98 in Kansas – was a wake-up call. It prompted several meetings with county authorities, local institutions and citizens, resulting in plans for more urban grocery stores and public works projects that aim to make sidewalks and roadways safer and more usable for pedestrians and bicyclists.

The rankings compare counties within each state. They’re based on data from vital statistics and government health surveys. In many cases, several years of data are used to calculate rankings, Remington said. For that reason, many rankings this year are similar to those from the 2010 report.

Premature deaths – people dying before age 75 of preventable diseases; self-reported health status; and the percent of low birth-weight babies contribute to the rankings. Other measures include obesity rates, unemployment, high school graduation rates and pollution.

Richard Sewell, a health policy specialist at the University of Illinois at Chicago, praised the report for including a wide array of important measures that affect health.

“It’s a call to action” that leaders beyond the medical realm pay attention to, Sewell said.

James Marks, director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s health group, said last year’s report resulted in an impressive amount of action in many counties that fared poorly. With annual rankings planned in the future, he said the reports likely will spur real improvement in Americans’ health.

Already, prompted by last year’s report:

• Jason Cook, an outreach pastor at Center Point United Baptist Church in Lincoln County, W.Va., started a wellness program to encourage parishioners to become more active, eat more healthy foods and lose weight. Overall, 18 people signed up and have lost nearly 250 pounds since January, Cook said.

• The chamber of commerce in Jackson, Tenn., in Madison County, is using health scores to help attract businesses to relocate in the area. Companies are asking about the region’s health, said Kyle Spurgeon, chamber president. The county fared better than the statewide average on some measures including the number of college graduates and primary-care doctors, in both reports. It slipped in other areas on this year’s report.

• LaSalle County, Ill. authorities are continuing with recent programs to distribute nicotine patches to smokers and increase awareness to school officials about diabetes and obesity, said county health department spokeswoman Jenny Barrie. The report emphasized the need to do so, she said.

• Authorities in central Michigan, where the lowest-ranked counties are located, created a “We Can” initiative to improve health measures including obesity, inactivity and poor nutrition. Monthly brainstorming sessions have been held involving officials from local health departments, mental health agencies, colleges and elsewhere, and a working plan is expected to be developed in April, said Mary Kushion, health officer for the Central Michigan District Health Department.

“We really do have a common theme and a common mission” Kushion said. “We know that we are much better prepared and able to address the issues than we were” last year.